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Hunting

  • Moose

    waggoner moose pictureAir Ivanhoe offers archery and rifle moose hunting adventure packages. We offer drive in, fly in, and boat in hunting trips.   Ontario allows for party hunting to take place, which means essentially that multiple hunters can hunt one moose tag. This is frequently done to both increase the chances of being sucessful on the tags that are purchased and to decrease the cost per hunter during the trip.   The most common hunt that we sell is a drive in archery bull moose hunt on a 4×1 ratio where the group also anticipates other hunting and fishing adventures once sucessfully harvesting their moose.   http://www.airivanhoe.com/brochure/Holiday_Letter.pdf

  • Bear

    Air Ivanhoe offers archery, muzzleloader, and rifle bear hunts from both our drive in and fly in lodges.  Ontario offers both a spring and fall season for bear hunting.  We work with hunters during both seasons, although we believe both the meat and the hide are generally better in the fall when they have fed on blueberries for several weeks before the hunt and are getting ready to go into hibernation.

    http://www.airivanhoe.com/brochure/BearHuntPackages-AirIvanhoe.pdf

  • Wolf

    Wolves can be hunted over bait, by using decoys and calls, or incidentally during the course of a hunt for another animal, most commonly moose.  We offer a guided baited wolf / bear combo in the middle of September.

  • Grouse/Partridge

    Grouse KulasGrouse AKA Partridge can be hunted from all of our cottages, with the exception of Bonar Lake which is in the Chapleau Game Preserve.  The season opens September 15 and runs through the end of our fall season.  The last week of September and first week of October are great weeks to chase these birds as we have typically had at least one frost to knock down the ferns and most of the leaves off the trees, making greater visibility through the dense forest.  Its also typically before the true Canadian cold winter sets in making it an ideal time to hunt these birds. In our area, we see approximately 60% Ruffed Grouse, 39% Spruce Grouse, and 1% Sharptail Grouse.  We also see plenty of woodcock when we’re hunting, especially in early morning and late evening.  Just remember that you will need a duck stamp to hunt woodcock as they are considered migratory waterfowl.

  • Rabbit

    We operate our lodges from early May to early November every year.  Rabbit season is open from September 15 to the end of our operating season.

  • Waterfowl

    Hunters wishing to hunt waterfowl will need to purchase a small game licence as well as a migratory duck stamp (which is about $20).  The duck stamps are sold at the post office in Foleyet, and can be pre-ordered ahead of time if your worried about missing the regular post office hours.

  • Hunting/Fishing Combo's

    Most of our hunters do also spend some time fishing during their trip.  Our moose hunters typically actively hunt early mornings and evenings and fish during the day.  Our bear hunters will typically fish in the mornings, hunt the afternoons, and again fish when they have harvested their bear.  Small game hunters really set their own schedule and fish whenever they want.  Waterfowl hunting over decoys is typically an early morning and late evening adventure, and fishing during the day.  We have packages that include boats, or others where you can bring your own boat.  We can also rent you a boat if you decide when your here that you want to spend a day or two fishing.

  • Archery

    Ontario allows crossbow, compound, and traditional recurve bow hunting for both big and small game.  Hunting for small game, we would recomment field points and judo tips.  Re bear and moose, we would recommend solid fixed blade broad heads of at least 100 grains for strength if you hit solid bone

  • Rifle

    We see everything from a 22 short for small game to a Lapua 338 for long distance shots on big game.  To bring any firearms across the border, they will need to be registered.  When you arrive at the border, simply tell the border guards that you are headed up on a hunting trip and have firearms to declare and register.  They will charge you $25 to register up to 3 firearms / hunter.  The registration is valid for 6 months.  Handguns, full automatic weapons, and several other categories of weapons are not eligible for entrance into Canada.  We would recomment avoiding bringing up firearms that resemble assault rifles to save hassles at the border.  Please see the following link if you have any questions about prohibited weapons in Canada.    http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/fs-fd/prohibited-prohibe-eng.htm

  • Muzzle Loaders

    Muzzle loaders can be brought and used for hunting for all species (except waterfowl).  They must be registered exactly like a rifle at the border.  There is no specific muzzleloader seasons in our hunting zones, and they would have to be used during the regular rifle hunting season.  As such, we very rarely see hunters choosing to use muzzle loaders because there is absolutely no advantage to choosing this weapon over a high powered rifle in terms of season dates, useful range, and accuracy.  We do often have inquiries from bear hunters, and have in the past worked with several successful bear hunters who choose to complete their hunt with a muzzleloader.  However, with the personal encounters from the guides and guests with living and wounded bears, we would strongly recommend that you bring a repeating firearm as you are hunting an animal that can and will kill and eat you under certain circumstances.

  • Bringing Guns To Canada

    Firearms need to be declared at the border.  No handguns, fully automatic weapons, altered / shortened weapons less than 660 mm in length with a barrel less than 457 mm in length, and certain other classes of weapons may not be imported into Canada.

    The following informaiton is directly from the RCMP website –    Prohibited Firearms

    Individuals who possess or wish to acquire a prohibited firearm should consult this information regarding the legal requirements under the Firearms Act.

    Definition of a prohibited firearm

    According to the Criminal Code, a prohibited firearm is:

    a handgun that

    has a barrel equal to or less than 105 mm in length, or

    is designed or adapted to discharge a 25 or 32 calibre cartridge, but does not include any such handgun that is prescribed, where the handgun is for use in international sporting competitions governed by the rules of the International Shooting Union,

    a firearm that is adapted from a rifle or shotgun, whether by sawing, cutting or any other alteration, and that, as so adapted,

    is less than 660 mm in length, or

    is 660 mm or greater in length and has a barrel less than 457 mm in length,

    an automatic firearm, whether or not it has been altered to discharge only one projectile with one pressure of the trigger, or

    any firearm that is prescribed to be a prohibited firearm

    Summary of key requirements

    Individuals are allowed to possess certain prohibited firearms if they had one registered in their name when it became prohibited, and they have continuously held a valid registration certificate for that type of prohibited firearm from December 1, 1998, onward. The Firearms Act refers to this as being “grandfathered”.

    “Grandfather” status

    A Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL) allows an individual to acquire only prohibited firearms in the same categories as the ones currently registered to them, and only if the firearms they wish to acquire were registered in Canada on December 1, 1998.

    As a general rule, a PAL will indicate what prohibited firearms the licence holder is licensed to acquire by showing the section of the Firearms Act that grandfathers them, as follows:

    s.12(2): full automatics

    s.12(3): converted automatics

    s.12(4): firearms prohibited by former prohibition order No. 12

    s.12(5): firearms prohibited by former prohibition order No. 13

    s.12(6): handguns with a barrel length of 105 mm or less or that discharge .25 or .32 calibre ammunition. On licences issued on or after April 10, 2005, these firearms will be referred to as 12(6.1) firearms.

    Eligibility to acquire a particular prohibited firearm will be confirmed during the transfer process. Grandfathered status allows the possession and acquisition of prohibited firearms that are already registered in Canada, but not the new importation of prohibited firearms into Canada.

    Maintaining grandfathered privileges

    To stay grandfathered for a particular category of prohibited firearm, an individual must have continuously held a registration certificate for a firearm in that category from December 1, 1998, onward. To be able to hold a registration certificate for a firearm, an individual needs a licence allowing them to possess that class of firearm. It is therefore essential that firearms licences be renewed before they expire.

    All registration certificates issued under the former law (prior to December 1, 1998) expired on December 31, 2002, so it was important to have re-registered the firearm(s) under the Firearms Act before the old certificate expired. Contact the CFP for more information or assistance.

    Exception to grandfathering

    If a person is not grandfathered, the only prohibited firearms they may possess or acquire are handguns with a barrel length of 105 mm or less or that discharge .25 or .32 calibre ammunition, and only if all of the following criteria are met:

    the handgun was made before 1946, and

    the handgun was registered in Canada on December 1, 1998, and

    the individual is the child, grandchild, brother, sister or spouse of the lawful owner, and

    the individual is acquiring it for an approved purpose such as target shooting or as part of a collection.

    Under these circumstances, the individual can lawfully acquire and possess the handgun in question, but they are not grandfathered or authorized to acquire more prohibited handguns.

    Selling, giving, or lending

    An individual can lend a prohibited firearm to anyone with a valid PAL which authorizes them to possess that particular category of prohibited firearm. If they lend the prohibited firearm, they must lend the registration certificate as well.

    They may sell or give a prohibited firearm only to someone with a PAL valid for that category of firearm. When the prohibited firearm changes owners, it must be registered to the new owner. This can be done by calling the CFP or by submitting form RCMP 5492.

    Transporting prohibited firearms

    All firearms must be unloaded and transported safely to deter loss, theft and accidents. Before transporting a prohibited firearm, it is necessary to obtain an Authorization to Transport (ATT) from the Chief Firearms Officer (CFO) of the province or territory in which the firearm is located. Call the CFP to apply for an ATT or submit form RCMP 5490 and mail or fax it to the relevant CFO.

    Firearms must be transported in accordance with the Storage, Display, Transportation and Handling of Firearms by Individuals Regulations. Prohibited handguns may be shipped between two locations in Canada, using the most secure method offered by Canada Post which requires a signature upon delivery. Alternatively, it may be shipped by a carrier company licensed to transport that class of firearm.

    For more information on which firearms are restricted or prohibited, please also consult the Criminal Code and the Regulations Prescribing Certain Firearms and Other Weapons, Components and Parts of Weapons, Accessories, Cartridge Magazines, Ammunition and Projectiles as Prohibited, Restricted or Non-Restricted.

    Information

    For more information, contact the CFP.

    This fact sheet is intended to provide general information only. For legal references, please refer to the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act and their corresponding regulations. Provincial, territorial and municipal laws, regulations and policies may also apply.                                Prohibited Firearms

    Individuals who possess or wish to acquire a prohibited firearm should consult this information regarding the legal requirements under the Firearms Act.

    Definition of a prohibited firearm

    According to the Criminal Code, a prohibited firearm is:

    a handgun that

    has a barrel equal to or less than 105 mm in length, or

    is designed or adapted to discharge a 25 or 32 calibre cartridge, but does not include any such handgun that is prescribed, where the handgun is for use in international sporting competitions governed by the rules of the International Shooting Union,

    a firearm that is adapted from a rifle or shotgun, whether by sawing, cutting or any other alteration, and that, as so adapted,

    is less than 660 mm in length, or

    is 660 mm or greater in length and has a barrel less than 457 mm in length,

    an automatic firearm, whether or not it has been altered to discharge only one projectile with one pressure of the trigger, or

    any firearm that is prescribed to be a prohibited firearm

    Summary of key requirements

    Individuals are allowed to possess certain prohibited firearms if they had one registered in their name when it became prohibited, and they have continuously held a valid registration certificate for that type of prohibited firearm from December 1, 1998, onward. The Firearms Act refers to this as being “grandfathered”.

    “Grandfather” status

    A Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL) allows an individual to acquire only prohibited firearms in the same categories as the ones currently registered to them, and only if the firearms they wish to acquire were registered in Canada on December 1, 1998.

    As a general rule, a PAL will indicate what prohibited firearms the licence holder is licensed to acquire by showing the section of the Firearms Act that grandfathers them, as follows:

    s.12(2): full automatics

    s.12(3): converted automatics

    s.12(4): firearms prohibited by former prohibition order No. 12

    s.12(5): firearms prohibited by former prohibition order No. 13

    s.12(6): handguns with a barrel length of 105 mm or less or that discharge .25 or .32 calibre ammunition. On licences issued on or after April 10, 2005, these firearms will be referred to as 12(6.1) firearms.

    Eligibility to acquire a particular prohibited firearm will be confirmed during the transfer process. Grandfathered status allows the possession and acquisition of prohibited firearms that are already registered in Canada, but not the new importation of prohibited firearms into Canada.

    Maintaining grandfathered privileges

    To stay grandfathered for a particular category of prohibited firearm, an individual must have continuously held a registration certificate for a firearm in that category from December 1, 1998, onward. To be able to hold a registration certificate for a firearm, an individual needs a licence allowing them to possess that class of firearm. It is therefore essential that firearms licences be renewed before they expire.

    All registration certificates issued under the former law (prior to December 1, 1998) expired on December 31, 2002, so it was important to have re-registered the firearm(s) under the Firearms Act before the old certificate expired. Contact the CFP for more information or assistance.

    Exception to grandfathering

    If a person is not grandfathered, the only prohibited firearms they may possess or acquire are handguns with a barrel length of 105 mm or less or that discharge .25 or .32 calibre ammunition, and only if all of the following criteria are met:

    the handgun was made before 1946, and

    the handgun was registered in Canada on December 1, 1998, and

    the individual is the child, grandchild, brother, sister or spouse of the lawful owner, and

    the individual is acquiring it for an approved purpose such as target shooting or as part of a collection.

    Under these circumstances, the individual can lawfully acquire and possess the handgun in question, but they are not grandfathered or authorized to acquire more prohibited handguns.

    Selling, giving, or lending

    An individual can lend a prohibited firearm to anyone with a valid PAL which authorizes them to possess that particular category of prohibited firearm. If they lend the prohibited firearm, they must lend the registration certificate as well.

    They may sell or give a prohibited firearm only to someone with a PAL valid for that category of firearm. When the prohibited firearm changes owners, it must be registered to the new owner. This can be done by calling the CFP or by submitting form RCMP 5492.

    Transporting prohibited firearms

    All firearms must be unloaded and transported safely to deter loss, theft and accidents. Before transporting a prohibited firearm, it is necessary to obtain an Authorization to Transport (ATT) from the Chief Firearms Officer (CFO) of the province or territory in which the firearm is located. Call the CFP to apply for an ATT or submit form RCMP 5490 and mail or fax it to the relevant CFO.

    Firearms must be transported in accordance with the Storage, Display, Transportation and Handling of Firearms by Individuals Regulations. Prohibited handguns may be shipped between two locations in Canada, using the most secure method offered by Canada Post which requires a signature upon delivery. Alternatively, it may be shipped by a carrier company licensed to transport that class of firearm.

    For more information on which firearms are restricted or prohibited, please also consult the Criminal Code and the Regulations Prescribing Certain Firearms and Other Weapons, Components and Parts of Weapons, Accessories, Cartridge Magazines, Ammunition and Projectiles as Prohibited, Restricted or Non-Restricted.

    Information

    For more information, contact the CFP.

    This fact sheet is intended to provide general information only. For legal references, please refer to the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act and their corresponding regulations. Provincial, territorial and municipal laws, regulations and policies may also apply.

  • Hand guns

    Handguns are generally not allowed to be brought into Canada.  There are obviously exceptions to this rule, but realistically if your coming to Canada on a tourism trip, you will not meet the requirements.  The border is not a great place to determine if you meet the requirements.

  • How To Get a Tag?

    Each animal is different.  Licences for small game, fishing, and duck can be purchased over the counter.  Big game licences are a bit more complicated.  Ontario residents can buy a bear tag over the counter.  Non residents must purchase their bear hunting licence through an outfitter, that has bear tags allocated to that business.  They are a limited quota tag.  Air Ivanhoe is annually allocated bear tags to help our non-residents have the bear hunt of a licetime experience.  Moose tags are a whole different ball game.  Ontario residents can buy a licence over the counter, buy a licence and adult moose tag from an outfitter, or can buy their licence as part of the moose draw which generally ends at the end of May.  The licence purchased is valid only for a calf moose (this years offspring) unless the individual is successful in the draw for an adult validation tag (a bull or cow tag).  Certain area’s of the province even have draws for calf moose.  This bizarre system of targeting baby moose was created by the MNR several decades ago in an attempt to increase the moose population while allowing more hunters to continue hunting and collecting maximum licence fees.  Non residents of Ontario must hunt through an outfitter and buy their licence from an outfitter, and do not have any lottery option for drawing a moose tag.

  • Season Dates

    Each species for fishing and hunting have different season dates.  These dates generally remain the same every year but do change occassionally so its worth checking the newest fishing / hunting regulations (or asking us) regarding the dates.  Generally, small game opens Sept 15, waterfowl opens Sept 10, archery moose in the 3rd week of October, rifle moose in the second week of November to November 15, bear spring May to June 15, bear fall August 15 to October 31.  The links to the most current MNRF (Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) are below 
    Hunting       https://www.ontario.ca/document/ontario-hunting-regulations-summary
    Our lodge is in Wildlife Management Zone 31, and we’re about 5 miles from the boundary with WMU 30.  We also have cabins in WMU 23 (south of Kapuskasing) and WMU 26 (north of Cochrane)
    Fishing         https://www.ontario.ca/document/ontario-fishing-regulations-summary
    Our specific zone summary (zone 8) is on the following link   http://files.ontario.ca/environment-and-energy/fishing/2018/2018-fmz-8-english.pdf
    Walleye season generally opens on the 3rd Saturday of May and through our season.
    Smallmouth bass, northern pike, perch, and whitefish are open year round in our area.
    Most stocked brook trout lakes are open year round.
    Natural brook trout runs from January 1 to September 15.
    Lake trout follows a season closely with walleye, opening on the 3rd Saturday in May and closing September 30.

  • Licenses

    We sell hunting and fishing licences at our drive in lodge, or they can be purchased online at the:
    MNRF website        https://www2.on.wildlifelicense.com/start.php?lang=1
    Hunting licence costs     https://www.ontario.ca/page/hunting-licence-fees-ontario-residents
    Fishing licence costs           https://www.ontario.ca/page/fishing-licence-fees-ontario-residents

  • Wildlife Management Zone

    Ontario’s fishing and hunting zones do not follow the same boundaries or the same names / numbers unfortunately.  In regards to hunting, our drive in lodge on Ivanhoe Lake is located in Wildlife Management Unit (WMU) 31.  We are about 5 miles from WMU 30, and have cottages in WMU 23 (south of Kapuskasing), WMU 26 (north of Cochrane), WMU 30 (5 miles north east of Ivanhoe’s drive in lodge) and WMU 31 (the location of our fly in lodge and many of our fly in outpost cottages).
    The following link has a detailed hunting WMU map for the province of Ontario.
    https://www.ontario.ca/travel-and-recreation/find-wildlife-management-unit-wmu-map
    In regards to fishing, our drive in lodge on Ivanhoe lodge just outside of Foleyet, Ontario is located in zone 8.  The following link will direct you to the regulations for our area.  https://www.ontario.ca/page/fisheries-management-zone-8-fmz-8